Patient Derived Xenograft (PDX)

*** Use of patient-derived xenograft models requires signed agreement ***

Patient-Derived Xenograft (PDX) models represent the cutting edge of cancer drug development, increasing our ability to advance novel, active agents into patients. A joint effort between the Pathology Core Facility and the Center for Developmental Therapeutics, the project uses a systematic approach to develop models across multiple tumor histologies in a way that benefits the entire institution. This repository allows many basic oncology research questions to be addressed using annotated tissue and models that closely resemble human cancer rather than cell lines.

Xenograft model or heterotransplantation of human cancer cell lines into immunodeficient mice has served for decades as the major preclinical screen for the development of novel cancer therapeutics. However, current cell line-xenograft tumor preclinical models could not predict success of oncology drug development. When the model of the xenograft tumor established from cancer cell line is used, novel therapeutics that were 97% successful in in vivo studies fail in clinic.

We have developed PDX tumor models of 12 different types of human cancer including:

  • Acute Myeloid Leukemia (AML)
  • Bladder
  • Breast
  • Colon
  • Endometrial
  • Glioblastoma (GBM)
  • Liver
  • Lung
  • Mesothelioma
  • Multiple Myeloma
  • Ovarian
  • Pancreatic
  • AML

    Type ID# Initial Trans. Date Age and Sex
    AML, Blood 390532 8/26/13  37, F

    Bladder

    Type ID# Initial Trans. Date Age and Sex
    Urothelial  392795  5/1/14  
    Urothelial  417362  1/11/16   76, M
    Urothelial  419309   3/2/16   71, M
    Urothelial  419322   3/9/16   85, M
    Urothelial  419336  4/6/16   71, F

    Breast

    Type ID# Initial Trans. Date Age and Sex
     Breast, pleural effusion  BC-1 2/7/13  
     Breast, pleural effusion  373342  3/8/13  39, F
     Breast, primary   413398 10/7/15  67, F

    Colon

    Type ID# Initial Trans. Date Age and Sex
     Colon  366780  4/2/13  86, F
     Colon  373801  4/4/13  61, F
     Colon  373893  6/18/13  

    Endometrial

    Type ID# Initial Trans. Date Age and Sex
    Endometrial 178-894L    

    GBM

    Type ID# Initial Trans. Date Age and Sex
     GBM  366742  2/27/13  49, M
     GBM  373811  4/10/13  65, F

    Liver

    Type ID# Initial Trans. Date Age and Sex
     HCC  417315 10/28/15  71, F

    Lung*

    Type ID# Initial Trans. Date Age and Sex
    Lung* 399633 1/15/14  79, M

    Mesothelioma

    Type ID# Initial Trans. Date Age and Sex
     Mesothelioma  398539  12/30/13  63, M
     Mesothelioma  403596  3/14/14  

    Multiple Myeloma

    Type ID# Initial Trans. Date Age and Sex
    Multiple Myeloma  408579  9/18/14  NA

    Ovarian

    Type ID# Initial Trans. Date Age and Sex
      S13-32193    
    HGSC OvCa4    
    HGSC OvCa5    
    HGSC OvCa6    
    HGSC OvCa7    
    HGSC OvCa8    
    HGSC OvCa9    
    HGSC OvCa10    
     HGSC  OvCa12    
     HGSC  OvCa13    

    Pancreatic

    Type ID# Initial Trans. Date Age and Sex
     PDAC  373835 5/6/13  62, M
     PDAC  379419  5/28/13  68, F
     PDAC  379492  6/28/13  60, M
     PDAC  UC12-1108-4  10/13/14  
     PDAC  UC12-1108-8  4/27/15  
     PDAC  UC12-1108-9  7/20/15  
     PDAC  UC12-1108-10  7/21/15  
     PDAC  UC12-1108-14  1/27/16  

 

Patient derived xenograft (PDX) tumor models emerged as a new approach for preclinical testing of novel anticancer compounds in vivo due to its preservation of key features, which includes invasiveness, stromal reaction, tumor vasculature and cellular diversity of human carcinomas. In contrast to a cell line-xenograft tumor model, PDX tumors are established from the transplantation of fresh tumor tissue from a cancer patient into a immunodeficient mouse.

Fresh tumor samples were obtained from cancer patients immediately after surgical resection. Initially, we transplanted a small piece of fresh human tumor tissue either subQ or intraperitoneally and then passaged the xenograft tumors in mice to expand the amount of tumor tissue frozen. We reproducibly use our frozen stock to establish PDX tumors for future in vivo studies. All PDX tumor models are available to NU research community. Please contact i-kandela [at] northwestern [dot] edu (subject: PDX%20Model) (Irawati (Angki) Kandela), Assistant Director of the Developmental Therapeutics Core, for more information about program development and PDX tumor availability.

The project is supported by the Baskes Foundation and Robert H. Lurie Comprehensive Cancer Center. The content is solely the responsibility of the authors and does not necessarily represent the official views of the Baskes Foundation and Robert H. Lurie Comprehensive Cancer Center.